Sociology

Division: Social Sciences

Sociology is the social science that studies human behavior at the societal level.  Students will acquire the ability to analyze and interpret qualitative and quantitative sociological data, communicate effectively about social issues, and identify group/cultural influences.

The most common career opportunities with a baccalaureate degree include: law, public administration, social services, applied research, leadership and management in non-profit organizations.

Transfer requirements in sociology are available in the Counseling Department. In all cases, students should consult with a counselor for specific transfer requirements.

Contact Information

Social Sciences Division Chair

Alicia Crumpler | (559) 737-4816 | aliciacr@cos.edu
Kern: 728F | Visalia Campus

Dean of Business, Social Science, and Consumer Family Studies

Jesse Wilcoxon | jessew@cos.edu
Kern: 716 | Visalia Campus

ETHN 001 Black American Studies 3 unit(s)
Hours: 3 Lecture/Discussion
This course uses an interdisciplinary approach to Black Studies covering periods of social, cultural and historical development. Topics include African civilization, slavery, the Diaspora, abolition, reconstruction, segregation, Harlem Renaissance, and the Civil Rights Movement. Field trips may be a part of this course.
Advisory on Recommended Preparation: ENGL 251 or ENGL 261 or equivalent college course with "C" or better or eligibility for ENGL 1 as determined by COS Placement Procedures
ETHN 002 American Indian Studies 3 unit(s)
Hours: 3 Lecture/Discussion
Using an interdisciplinary approach, this course will focus on the historical, social, religious, ecological, economic, and artistic characteristics of various Indian Nations, as well as U.S. Government policy toward Indians. Special attention will be given to San Joaquin Valley Indians. Field trips may be part of this course.
Advisory on Recommended Preparation: ENGL 251 or ENGL 261 or equivalent college course with "C" or better or eligibility for ENGL 1 as determined by COS Placement Procedures
ETHN 003 Mexican-American Studies 3 unit(s)
Hours: 3 Lecture/Discussion
The course studies the Mexican-American community and culture in American society from Pre-Colombian roots. The Mexican-American contributions and conflicts in American society are studied using an interdisciplinary approach (anthropology, history, sociology, literature, art and music).
Advisory on Recommended Preparation: ENGL 251 or equivalent college course with "C" or better or eligibility for ENGL 1 as determined by COS Placement Procedures
ETHN 004 Asian American Studies 3 unit(s)
Hours: 3 Lecture/Discussion
This course explores the Asian immigrant experience in the United States (Southeast Asian, Chinese, Japanese, Korean, and Filipino). Using an interdisciplinary approach (social, historical, religious, geographic, economic, linguistic, and artistic), special attention will be given to major immigrant populations in the San Joaquin Valley (Laotian, Hmong, Mien, and Lahu).
Advisory on Recommended Preparation: ENGL 251 or ENGL 261 or equivalent college course with "C" or better, or eligiblity for ENGL 1 as determined by COS Placement Procedures
ETHN 005 American Ethnic Origins 3 unit(s)
Hours: 3 Lecture/Discussion
An examination of the various ethnic groups that came to America from Europe. Topics include: motives for migration, immigration, assimilation, social mobility, social change and the creation of a modern multicultural society. Special attention will be given to the migration of Euro-Americans into the San Joaquin Valley.
Advisory on Recommended Preparation: ENGL 251 or equivalent college course with "C" or better or eligibility for ENGL 001 as determined by COS Placement Procedures
SOC 001 Introduction to Sociology 3 unit(s)
Hours: 3 Lecture/Discussion
Equivalent Course: SOC 001H
Sociology 1 is an introductory study covering basic concepts, principles, methods, and theoretical perspectives of sociology. Topics include culture, personality, social inequality, diversity, institutions, population and ecology, and social change. Course objectives include the ability to apply sociological principles to everyday life. Approved for Distance Learning format. (C-ID SOCI110)
Prerequisites: ENGL 251 or ENGL 261 or equivalent college course with "C" or better
SOC 002 Social Problems 3 unit(s)
Hours: 3 Lecture/Discussion
An identification and analysis of contemporary social problems including (1) the role of power and ideology in the definition of social problems, (2) their causes and consequences, (3) evaluations of proposed solutions, and (4) methods of intervention. Topics will vary. (C-ID SOCI115)
Prerequisites: ENGL 251 or ENGL 261 or equivalent college course with "C" or better
SOC 010 Sociology of Gender 3 unit(s)
Hours: 3 Lecture/Discussion
Equivalent Course: SOC 110
This course explores the social construction of feminine and masculine identities both historically and in cross-cultural contexts and explores both the macro sociological understanding of gender as well as the micro level analysis of how individuals "do" gender. It analyzes the impact of economic and political change on gender expectations and practices. (C-ID SOCI140)
Advisory on Recommended Preparation: ENGL 251 or equivalent college course with "C" or better.
SOC 026 Marriage and Family Life 3 unit(s)
Hours: 3 Lecture/Discussion
Equivalent Course: CFS 026
A sociological analysis of the family, including historical and recent changes, present nature and the socio-cultural and economic forces shaping these changes. Including this analysis, the following topics will be covered: dating and mate-selection, communication conflict resolution, dual career families, human sexuality, family planning, parenthood, divorce and remarriage, changing gender roles and family economics. (C-ID SOCI130)
Advisory on Recommended Preparation: ENGL 251 or equivalent college course with "C" or better or eligibility for ENGL 1 as determined by COS Placement Procedures.
SOC 043 Sociology of Deviance 3 unit(s)
Hours: 3 Lecture/Discussion
Equivalent Course: SOC 143
Students in this course will examine rule breaking behavior and society's responses to it. The course considers deviance as a social phenomenon, cause, consequences and methods of social control.
Advisory on Recommended Preparation: ENGL 251 or ENGL 261 or equivalent college course with "C" or better or eligibility for ENGL 1 as determined by COS Placement Procedures
SSCI 025 Statistics - Social Sciences 4 unit(s)
Hours: 4 Lecture/Discussion
Equivalent Course: SSCI 125
The course offers an introduction to the appropriate use of statistical techniques across a wide variety of disciplines including the use of probability, hypothesis testing, and predictive techniques to facilitate decision-making. Other topics include descriptive statistics; probability and sampling distributions; statistical inference; correlation and linear regression; analysis of variance, chi-square and t-tests; and application of technology for statistical analysis including the interpretation of the relevance of the statistical findings. The role of quantitative methods in social science research is emphasized. (C-ID SOCI 125 or C-ID MATH 110)
Prerequisites: (MATH 230 or equivalent college course with "C" or better
SSCI 050 Law and Democracy 3 unit(s)
Hours: 3 Lecture/Discussion
Equivalent Course: SSCI 150
This course is an interdisciplinary exploration of themes such as equality, citizenship, participation, access, and social justice. Students will examine legal structures and limits in democracy and look at the idea of democracy as a universal value. This course will cover the evaluation, debate, and critical analysis of legal issues that affect individuals, their families, and communities. Students will learn about practical aspects of civil, criminal, constitutional, family, immigration, and consumer law in a diverse society with an orientation toward civic involvement in the local community.
Advisory on Recommended Preparation: POLS 005 or equivalent college course with "C" or better
SSCI 121 Civic Learning 1 unit(s)
Hours: 1 Lecture/Discussion
This course requires students to get hands-on experience and strengthen ties in the community, specifically related to the legal field. Possible examples include: voter information drives, volunteering at a legal service office or other law-related agencies, working on development of legislation and advocacy for public policies.

Sociology

Medrano, Catherine
B.A., University of California, San Diego
M.A., University of California, Santa Barbara

Silva, Diane
B.A., College Of St. Benedict
M.A., California State University, Sacramento
M.S.W., California State University, Fresno